Home

CORNWALL’S SPECIAL BIRD

Choughs are definitely the most glamorous and captivating members of the crow family. With their glossy black plumage, curved crimson-red bill and red legs they are unmistakeable.

Choughs have been recorded as part of Cornish history since at least the 13th century. Their old Cornish name is Palores, meaning 'digger' and that's just what they do to find their invertebrate food.

The choughs in Cornwall are totally wild, they have not been introduced. A few birds came across from Ireland in 2001 and the rest, as they say, is history. Cornwall's national emblem is back where it belongs, part of Kernow heritage once more.

To contact us for more information about the choughs, on volunteering as part of the chough team, events or to report your chough sightings, please email cornishchoughs@rspb.org.uk or call 01392 453775.

View our new Chough Leaflet

Who are we?

When the red-billed chough first appeared back on Cornwall's coast, the RSPB, National Trust and Natural England formed The Cornwall Chough Project. A Partnership working together to secure a future for choughs in Cornwall through establishing suitable habitat and carrying out nest protection and monitoring.

Viagra ED treatment is effective for mild and moderate form of erectile problems. Like any PDE5 inhibitor, Viagra uses physiology that draws blood to penile tissues.

The Cornish Chough Conservation Network has now been formed to recognise that choughs will always need help either by safeguarding nest sites or ensuring there is enough habitat for a sustainable future.  There is more that just the three organisations working for the benefit of chough and the network represents not only them but all the volunteers, farmers, landowners and local communities who have all played a part in the choughs' success and we hope will continue to do so.

 

 

Cornish Choughs

CORNWALL’S SPECIAL BIRD

Choughs are definitely the most glamorous and captivating members of the crow family. With their glossy black plumage, curved crimson-red bill and red legs they are unmistakeable.

Choughs have been recorded as part of Cornish history since at least the 13th century. Their old Cornish name is Palores, meaning 'digger' and that's just what they do to find their invertebrate food.

The choughs in Cornwall are totally wild, they have not been introduced. A few birds came across from Ireland in 2001 and the rest, as they say, is history. Cornwall's national emblem is back where it belongs, part of Kernow heritage once more.

To contact us for more information about the choughs, on volunteering as part of the chough team, events or to report your chough sightings, please email cornishchoughs@rspb.org.uk or call 01392 453775.

View our new Chough Leaflet

Who are we?

When the red-billed chough first appeared back on Cornwall's coast, the RSPB, National Trust and Natural England formed The Cornwall Chough Project. A Partnership working together to secure a future for choughs in Cornwall through establishing suitable habitat and carrying out nest protection and monitoring.

The Cornish Chough Conservation Network has now been formed to recognise that choughs will always need help either by safeguarding nest sites or ensuring there is enough habitat for a sustainable future.  There is more that just the three organisations working for the benefit of chough and the network represents not only them but all the volunteers, farmers, landowners and local communities who have all played a part in the choughs' success and we hope will continue to do so.

 

 

The Return

CORNWALL’S SPECIAL BIRD

Choughs are definitely the most glamorous and captivating members of the crow family. With their glossy black plumage, curved crimson-red bill and red legs they are unmistakeable.

Choughs have been recorded as part of Cornish history since at least the 13th century. Their old Cornish name is Palores, meaning 'digger' and that's just what they do to find their invertebrate food.

The choughs in Cornwall are totally wild, they have not been introduced. A few birds came across from Ireland in 2001 and the rest, as they say, is history. Cornwall's national emblem is back where it belongs, part of Kernow heritage once more.

To contact us for more information about the choughs, on volunteering as part of the chough team, events or to report your chough sightings, please email cornishchoughs@rspb.org.uk or call 01392 453775.

View our new Chough Leaflet

Who are we?

When the red-billed chough first appeared back on Cornwall's coast, the RSPB, National Trust and Natural England formed The Cornwall Chough Project. A Partnership working together to secure a future for choughs in Cornwall through establishing suitable habitat and carrying out nest protection and monitoring.

The Cornish Chough Conservation Network has now been formed to recognise that choughs will always need help either by safeguarding nest sites or ensuring there is enough habitat for a sustainable future.  There is more that just the three organisations working for the benefit of chough and the network represents not only them but all the volunteers, farmers, landowners and local communities who have all played a part in the choughs' success and we hope will continue to do so.

 

 

Where to see Choughs

CORNWALL’S SPECIAL BIRD

Choughs are definitely the most glamorous and captivating members of the crow family. With their glossy black plumage, curved crimson-red bill and red legs they are unmistakeable.

Choughs have been recorded as part of Cornish history since at least the 13th century. Their old Cornish name is Palores, meaning 'digger' and that's just what they do to find their invertebrate food.

The choughs in Cornwall are totally wild, they have not been introduced. A few birds came across from Ireland in 2001 and the rest, as they say, is history. Cornwall's national emblem is back where it belongs, part of Kernow heritage once more.

To contact us for more information about the choughs, on volunteering as part of the chough team, events or to report your chough sightings, please email cornishchoughs@rspb.org.uk or call 01392 453775.

View our new Chough Leaflet

Who are we?

When the red-billed chough first appeared back on Cornwall's coast, the RSPB, National Trust and Natural England formed The Cornwall Chough Project. A Partnership working together to secure a future for choughs in Cornwall through establishing suitable habitat and carrying out nest protection and monitoring.

The Cornish Chough Conservation Network has now been formed to recognise that choughs will always need help either by safeguarding nest sites or ensuring there is enough habitat for a sustainable future.  There is more that just the three organisations working for the benefit of chough and the network represents not only them but all the volunteers, farmers, landowners and local communities who have all played a part in the choughs' success and we hope will continue to do so.